Art in the OK Capitol: Transfer of the Louisiana Purchase – 1803

“Transfer of the Louisiana Purchase – 1803”

All session this year, I will try every week to post a picture I take of a piece of art from the walls of the Oklahoma Capitol, and give you a little bit of historical background.

This week’s piece is “Transfer of the Louisiana Purchase – 1803” by Mike Wimmer.   It was donated by Henry and Jane Primeaux in 2003.   It hangs just outside the Senate Chamber on the 4th floor, above where the lobbyists congregate.

Oklahomans don’t generally think of ourselves as residents of former French territory, but of course we are.  This painting depicts the scene in New Orleans in 1803 as France transferred to the United States the land that included what would one day become Oklahoma.    The United States paid France $15 million for 828,000 square miles.   A century later, Oklahoma became the final state carved out of the purchase.

Here is more information from the Oklahoma Arts Council.

Senator Holt featured in “Thunder Boom”

OETA recently featured Senator David Holt in its new episode of Stateline entitled “Thunder Boom”.   It can be viewed here.

Norman Transcript: “Senate Education Committee passes Parent Empowerment Act”

The Norman Transcript has coverage here of the passage of Senator David Holt’s “Parent Empowerment Act” in the Senate Education Committee.

KFOR features Senator Holt in piece on federal sequester

KFOR featured Senator David Holt in a piece on the effects of the federal sequester in Oklahoma.   It can be viewed here.

The Oklahoman editorializes in favor of “Spring Cleaning Commission”

The Oklahoman recently editorialized in favor of Senator David H0lt’s proposed “Spring Cleaning Commission.”   You can read the editorial here.

Update on First Month of Session

Among media interviews this week was this KFOR appearance talking about the effect of the federal “sequester” on Oklahoma

The Oklahoma Legislature spends four months every year primarily doing two things – passing laws and making a budget for the state.  The first four weeks of our session are spent hearing bills in committee – bills that may ultimately become laws.  If your bill doesn’t survive that step in the process, it’s dead for the year.   That process is now complete, and I have 12 bills headed to the Senate floor.

A bill to make “Black Friday” and other low-price sales legal in Oklahoma (more on this here)

A bill to create the “Parent Empowerment Act” (more on this here)

A bill to create a “Spring Cleaning Commission” (more on this here)

A bill to restore the free market to hiring and repeal the 1991 creation of a protected class for smokers

A bill to make school support employees “at-will” like private sector employees

A bill to protect the presidential choice of Oklahoma voters if a presidential elector violates their oath

A bill to ensure state agencies are following competitive bidding act

A bill to make it easier for cities to enforce codes against high weeds and to prevent wildfires

A bill to strengthen the penalties for SNAP fraud

A bill to keep sex offenders on the registry until they complete their sentence

A bill to require certain state agencies file reports justifying their expenditures and fees

A bill to create alternative dispute resolution for assisted living facilities

We are beginning to hear bills on the Senate floor.   Today, we passed landmark workers compensation reform that will dramatically lower costs for Oklahoma employers.   I was honored to sign on as a co-author of that bill.

I’ll also continue serving as the Vice Chair of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Select Agencies.  We  have already heard from many agencies that have rarely been asked to answer questions at the Legislature.   That work will continue all session.

Art in the OK Capitol: The Fort Smith Council – 1865

“The Fort Smith Council – 1865″

All session this year, I will try every week to post a picture I take of a piece of art from the walls of the Oklahoma Capitol, and give you a little bit of historical background.

This week’s piece is “The Fort Smith Council – 1865” by Mike Wimmer.   It was donated by Paula Marshall-Chapman and Lilah B. Marshall in 2006.   It hangs just outside the Senate Chamber, around the corner from my office, on the 4th floor of the Capitol.

The painting depicts the scene as the United States government negotiated treaties with the American Indian tribes who had sided with the Confederacy during the Civil War.   During these negotiations, Choctaw Chief Allen Wright first proposed that the territory be known as “Oklahoma,” which was Choctaw for “Land of the Red Man.”

Here is more information from the Oklahoma Arts Council.

Senator Holt on “Get to Know a Legislator”

Oklahoma Capitol Source posted an interview today with Senator David Holt as part of its “Get to Know a Legislator” series.  You can listen to it here.

Update on Week Two of the 2013 OK Legislative Session

Among media interviews this week was this OETA appearance that will air in April…

The Oklahoma Legislature spends four months every year primarily doing two things – passing laws and making a budget for the state.  The first three weeks of our session are spent hearing bills in committee – bills that may ultimately become laws.  If your bill doesn’t survive that step in the process, it’s dead for the year.   This past week, the second week of this session, I had five bills pass out of committee:

A bill to make “Black Friday” and other low-price sales legal in Oklahoma (more on this here)

A bill to restore the free market to hiring and repeal the 1991 creation of a protected class for smokers

A bill to make it easier for cities to enforce codes against high weeds

A bill to strengthen the penalties for SNAP fraud

A bill to keep sex offenders on the registry until they complete their sentence

This coming week, I’ll have more bills heard in committee.  I’ll also be a part of vetting other Senators’ bills as a member of the Education, Judiciary, Appropriations and Public Safety committees.   Most notably, in the Judiciary Committee this week, we’ll be hearing landmark workers’ compensation legislation, intended to dramatically reduce the cost of workers’ compensation.

I’ll also continue serving as the Vice Chair of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Select Agencies.  We began our work two weeks ago and have already heard from nearly a dozen agencies  that have rarely been asked to answer questions at the Legislature.

 

The Oklahoman editorializes in favor of Senator Holt’s uninsured driver bill

Today, The Oklahoman editorializes in favor of Senator David Holt’s bill to crack down on uninsured drivers.   You can read it here.

The Oklahoman follows-up on Senator Holt’s 2012 TANF bill

Today, The Oklahoman follows-up on Senator David Holt’s 2012 bill that barred TANF recipients from using illegal drugs.   You can read it here.

Introducing the Staff

I’d like to introduce the two women who will join me in serving the 30th Senate District of Oklahoma this legislative session.
As has been the case since I took office, Dorynda Dusek (right) will be serving as Executive Assistant.
For this session, we are also joined by Ashlyn Scott (left), a junior at the University of Oklahoma majoring in Political Science.   She is our intern this session through the Capitol Scholars Program.
Call (405) 521-5636 and they’ll be happy to help!

Art in the OK Capitol: President Roosevelt Signs Statehood Proclamation

“President Theodore Roosevelt Signing Statehood Proclamation”

All session this year, I will try every week to post a picture I take of a piece of art from the walls of the Oklahoma Capitol, and give you a little bit of historical background.

This week’s piece is “President Theodore Roosevelt Signing Statehood Proclamation” by Mike Wimmer.   It was donated by the Helmerich Foundation in 2003.   It hangs just outside the Senate Chamber on the 4th floor of the Capitol.

The painting depicts the scene in the White House at 9:16 a.m. on November 16, 1907, when President Theodore Roosevelt sign the proclamation that officially made Oklahoma the nation’s 46th state.   This was the final official act in what had been a long process that in some ways began when the land that would become Oklahoma was acquired through the Louisiana Purchase.

A small delegation of Oklahomans witnessed the signing ceremony, and one asked if he could have the ink blotter that President Roosevelt was using.   That moment is recorded in the painting, as President Roosevelt hands the blotter to Albert Hammer of Enid.

 

Senator David Holt Talks About OKC’s Renaissance

Senator David Holt recently spoke to Virginia Beach’s ABC affiliate about Oklahoma City’s renaissance.   You can watch his appearances here, here, here, and here.

The Oklahoman: “Bills aim to crack down on state’s uninsured drivers”

Here is coverage from The Oklahoman on Senator David Holt’s bill to create a system where tags can be seized when a driver is cited for not having insurance (SB 701).